Check out this Etsy shop!

I usually wouldn’t post something like this but I’ve opened my own etsy store. I’ve put alot of work into these two mini journals/ albums. I need to know if people like them and if there’s anything I should change. I only placed 2 up for sale to see how well they would do. Your input is always welcome. If you could please reblog. Thank you so much.

Wednesday Jun 11 @ 11:50pm
Check out this Etsy shop!

I usually wouldn’t post something like this but I’ve opened my own etsy store. I’ve put alot of work into these two mini journals/ albums. I need to know if people like them and if there’s anything I should change. I only placed 2 up for sale to see how well they would do. Your input is always welcome. If you could please reblog. Thank you so much.

Wednesday Jun 11 @ 11:50pm

It hurts me to know that even though we may have our ups and downs, you run your mouth and talk shit about your family to everyone but you wouldn’t drop a single bad word about your friends even if they make you just as mad. It’s sad to know you don’t have respect for your family to keep your fucking mouth shut. Rant over.

Wednesday May 28 @ 12:27pm
http://fightingforwhales.tumblr.com/post/86758928584/practicallydisney-fightingforwhales

practicallydisney:

fightingforwhales:

fightingforwhales:

practicallydisney:

If you have seen or heard of the “documentary” Blackfish

Educate yourself on the truth.

just a piece of advice, if you wanna convince people that SeaWorld is a good place you…

If Sea World was absolutely 100% devoted to rescuing and rehabilitating animals we would see all types of animals including orcas and dolphins constantly coming in and out of Sea World. So to say that they are devoted to that purpose is ridiculous. However caring for there animals is not the word I would have chosen. Sure they feed there animals and may give them some stimulation but they also provide inadequate space for their animals. The stimulation is also, nothing like they would receive in their natural habitat.

I practically lived at Sea World Orlando since I was 3 years old. Tilly has been my favorite whale since I could remember. Growing up, I knew I wanted to train Orcas, however when I was 16 I realized what was happening was wrong. I stopped attending Sea World when I was 18. I’m now 22 and every weekend my fiance asks me if I want to go. I’d be lying to say that I don’t want to visit, all I used to do there is sit in the underwater viewing area and watch the whales, mainly Tilly swim in circles. From the time I was 13 until now I have studied Orcas, reading reports and articles on them, watching wild life films and looking into whale watching camps in Vancouver and Washington state. Since I live so close to Sea World it is very hard for me not to go. It’s killed me not being there checking up on Tilly every weekend like I used to.

I can’t say I’m an expert at knowing everything about Orcas in the wild, but I can say that what I’ve seen and witnessed at Sea World was wrong and Sea World lies to make money. I do believe if they rehabilitated marine life and didn’t have shows and taught the public about these animals through natural behavior while being cared for to return to the wild, they would make more money then they do now. But that’s not going to happen. I’d rather travel 1000 miles to sea wild life then to watch them swim in circles and preform tricks for food.

Sunday May 25 @ 12:36am
Tuesday May 20 @ 10:08pm

fallontonight:

Jennifer Lawrence had a bit of an awkward interaction with JLO and Jimmy may be to blame! 

Friday May 16 @ 10:41pm
coffeeandkudzu:

betheirvoiceseathechange:

betheirvoiceseathechange:

breakthewhalebowl:

nimwey:

So many anti-caps seem to be under the delusion that the wild is just a happy Disney Land for wild animals, and that they only ever get injuries/rakes/floppy fins/worn teeth/miscarriages/stillborns/dead calves/attack animals (such as ourselves) in captivity, that I felt this was really needed.

Ok you cocky little brat, I don’t have the energy or time to begin to touch the surface of this post. But I know people who do. Take it from here yoursuchatwat themidnightclub bethevoiceseathechange
Have fun getting learned.

*crack knuckles* I’ll be on the computer in a few minutes..

Also
coffeeandkudzu
do you want to take a crack at this one?


Re: collapsed fins — collapsed fins do occur in the wild as a result of trauma and disease. Stranded orcas’ dorsals tend to begin to collapse while the rescue team waits for the tides to come in. The pod of Resident Killer Whales that unfortunately and fatefully swam through the Exxon Valdez oil spill experienced dorsal collapse and a large number of their pod has subsequently died (cntrl+f “dorsal”). Reproduction within that pod has ceased or is practically non-existent and it’s probably not going to make it past another generation. The surviving sons of deceased killer whale mothers dorsals tend to collapse, clearly from psychological trauma. (I saw a photo recently on tumblr maybe?? If I can get tag numbers for some of these wild whales, that would be great. cute-whales is right, we really do need a central database of articles.)
[ETA: oops, I’ve been corrected — it was actually youresuchatwat who wanted to make a database and I’m TOTES DOWN TO DO WHAT I CAN but I do have other stuff that has to come first like work + my writing DRAFTOCALYPSE this summer. Anyway — sorry for the mis-tag!]
Flukes curling under is natural in male whales and occurs as they mature. Orca flukes contain no bones, unlike pectoral fins, and it’s simply the weight of the flesh (obvi — more in males) + the water pressure from forward propulsion that causes the curling. Those last two pictures are irrelevant.
Re: rakes and scars — no anticap worth their salt states that rakes do not occur in the wild. Orca scientists have even noted that rakes occur in the wild. What we argue is that orcas in the wild have A WHOLE OCEAN in which they can dart and evade contact with orcas with whom they have rocky relationships.
Re: no animals dying in the wild — UHM WHAT #NO. Transient orcas are meat eaters. They eat penguins, seals, sea lions, even other dolphins. Meanwhile, SeaWorld (or whatever unpaid intern they let man the message boards) doesn’t even seem to know the difference between Transient and Resident orcas.
Infant orcas have a 50% mortality rate in the wild. Tbh, that’s on par with most wild animals generally. Mother killer whales grieve for their lost children and will push the carcass on their rostrum until they have come to terms with their loss, finally letting the carcass drop. Dolphins do the same thing.
Re: the last two photographs in this set — The first is clearly an injury. (Is that one of the Stumpys?). Ben (New Zealand) was run over by a boat prop and the larger piece has flopped over. See above — trauma can cause collapse.
Re: ground-down teeth — some whales, particularly in the Pacific Community, hunt sharks. Sharks have rough skin. It’s now believed that these worn down teeth are a direct result of hunting sharks. NOT FROM CHEWING ON CONCRETE OR JAW POPPING ON METAL GATES FROM FRUSTRATION. Luckily, even where mature orcas are no longer able to tear at the carcass, they are social animals and are known to divide and share their kills. (Plus, the way an orca kills a shark is actually strangely bloodless. They flip it over to induce tonic immobility, and then hold it still until it drowns. Donezo.)

coffeeandkudzu:

betheirvoiceseathechange:

betheirvoiceseathechange:

breakthewhalebowl:

nimwey:

So many anti-caps seem to be under the delusion that the wild is just a happy Disney Land for wild animals, and that they only ever get injuries/rakes/floppy fins/worn teeth/miscarriages/stillborns/dead calves/attack animals (such as ourselves) in captivity, that I felt this was really needed.

Ok you cocky little brat, I don’t have the energy or time to begin to touch the surface of this post. But I know people who do. Take it from here yoursuchatwat themidnightclub bethevoiceseathechange

Have fun getting learned.

*crack knuckles* I’ll be on the computer in a few minutes..

Also
coffeeandkudzu
do you want to take a crack at this one?

Re: collapsed fins — collapsed fins do occur in the wild as a result of trauma and disease. Stranded orcas’ dorsals tend to begin to collapse while the rescue team waits for the tides to come in. The pod of Resident Killer Whales that unfortunately and fatefully swam through the Exxon Valdez oil spill experienced dorsal collapse and a large number of their pod has subsequently died (cntrl+f “dorsal”). Reproduction within that pod has ceased or is practically non-existent and it’s probably not going to make it past another generation. The surviving sons of deceased killer whale mothers dorsals tend to collapse, clearly from psychological trauma. (I saw a photo recently on tumblr maybe?? If I can get tag numbers for some of these wild whales, that would be great. cute-whales is right, we really do need a central database of articles.)

[ETA: oops, I’ve been corrected — it was actually youresuchatwat who wanted to make a database and I’m TOTES DOWN TO DO WHAT I CAN but I do have other stuff that has to come first like work + my writing DRAFTOCALYPSE this summer. Anyway — sorry for the mis-tag!]

Flukes curling under is natural in male whales and occurs as they mature. Orca flukes contain no bones, unlike pectoral fins, and it’s simply the weight of the flesh (obvi — more in males) + the water pressure from forward propulsion that causes the curling. Those last two pictures are irrelevant.

Re: rakes and scars — no anticap worth their salt states that rakes do not occur in the wild. Orca scientists have even noted that rakes occur in the wild. What we argue is that orcas in the wild have A WHOLE OCEAN in which they can dart and evade contact with orcas with whom they have rocky relationships.

Re: no animals dying in the wild — UHM WHAT #NO. Transient orcas are meat eaters. They eat penguins, seals, sea lions, even other dolphins. Meanwhile, SeaWorld (or whatever unpaid intern they let man the message boards) doesn’t even seem to know the difference between Transient and Resident orcas.

Infant orcas have a 50% mortality rate in the wild. Tbh, that’s on par with most wild animals generally. Mother killer whales grieve for their lost children and will push the carcass on their rostrum until they have come to terms with their loss, finally letting the carcass drop. Dolphins do the same thing.

Re: the last two photographs in this set — The first is clearly an injury. (Is that one of the Stumpys?). Ben (New Zealand) was run over by a boat prop and the larger piece has flopped over. See above — trauma can cause collapse.

Re: ground-down teeth — some whales, particularly in the Pacific Community, hunt sharks. Sharks have rough skin. It’s now believed that these worn down teeth are a direct result of hunting sharks. NOT FROM CHEWING ON CONCRETE OR JAW POPPING ON METAL GATES FROM FRUSTRATION. Luckily, even where mature orcas are no longer able to tear at the carcass, they are social animals and are known to divide and share their kills. (Plus, the way an orca kills a shark is actually strangely bloodless. They flip it over to induce tonic immobility, and then hold it still until it drowns. Donezo.)

Thursday May 15 @ 08:00am
coffeeandkudzu:

betheirvoiceseathechange:

betheirvoiceseathechange:

breakthewhalebowl:

nimwey:

So many anti-caps seem to be under the delusion that the wild is just a happy Disney Land for wild animals, and that they only ever get injuries/rakes/floppy fins/worn teeth/miscarriages/stillborns/dead calves/attack animals (such as ourselves) in captivity, that I felt this was really needed.

Ok you cocky little brat, I don’t have the energy or time to begin to touch the surface of this post. But I know people who do. Take it from here yoursuchatwat themidnightclub bethevoiceseathechange
Have fun getting learned.

*crack knuckles* I’ll be on the computer in a few minutes..

Also
coffeeandkudzu
do you want to take a crack at this one?


Re: collapsed fins — collapsed fins do occur in the wild as a result of trauma and disease. Stranded orcas’ dorsals tend to begin to collapse while the rescue team waits for the tides to come in. The pod of Resident Killer Whales that unfortunately and fatefully swam through the Exxon Valdez oil spill experienced dorsal collapse and a large number of their pod has subsequently died (cntrl+f “dorsal”). Reproduction within that pod has ceased or is practically non-existent and it’s probably not going to make it past another generation. The surviving sons of deceased killer whale mothers dorsals tend to collapse, clearly from psychological trauma. (I saw a photo recently on tumblr maybe?? If I can get tag numbers for some of these wild whales, that would be great. cute-whales is right, we really do need a central database of articles.)
[ETA: oops, I’ve been corrected — it was actually youresuchatwat who wanted to make a database and I’m TOTES DOWN TO DO WHAT I CAN but I do have other stuff that has to come first like work + my writing DRAFTOCALYPSE this summer. Anyway — sorry for the mis-tag!]
Flukes curling under is natural in male whales and occurs as they mature. Orca flukes contain no bones, unlike pectoral fins, and it’s simply the weight of the flesh (obvi — more in males) + the water pressure from forward propulsion that causes the curling. Those last two pictures are irrelevant.
Re: rakes and scars — no anticap worth their salt states that rakes do not occur in the wild. Orca scientists have even noted that rakes occur in the wild. What we argue is that orcas in the wild have A WHOLE OCEAN in which they can dart and evade contact with orcas with whom they have rocky relationships.
Re: no animals dying in the wild — UHM WHAT #NO. Transient orcas are meat eaters. They eat penguins, seals, sea lions, even other dolphins. Meanwhile, SeaWorld (or whatever unpaid intern they let man the message boards) doesn’t even seem to know the difference between Transient and Resident orcas.
Infant orcas have a 50% mortality rate in the wild. Tbh, that’s on par with most wild animals generally. Mother killer whales grieve for their lost children and will push the carcass on their rostrum until they have come to terms with their loss, finally letting the carcass drop. Dolphins do the same thing.
Re: the last two photographs in this set — The first is clearly an injury. (Is that one of the Stumpys?). Ben (New Zealand) was run over by a boat prop and the larger piece has flopped over. See above — trauma can cause collapse.
Re: ground-down teeth — some whales, particularly in the Pacific Community, hunt sharks. Sharks have rough skin. It’s now believed that these worn down teeth are a direct result of hunting sharks. NOT FROM CHEWING ON CONCRETE OR JAW POPPING ON METAL GATES FROM FRUSTRATION. Luckily, even where mature orcas are no longer able to tear at the carcass, they are social animals and are known to divide and share their kills. (Plus, the way an orca kills a shark is actually strangely bloodless. They flip it over to induce tonic immobility, and then hold it still until it drowns. Donezo.)

coffeeandkudzu:

betheirvoiceseathechange:

betheirvoiceseathechange:

breakthewhalebowl:

nimwey:

So many anti-caps seem to be under the delusion that the wild is just a happy Disney Land for wild animals, and that they only ever get injuries/rakes/floppy fins/worn teeth/miscarriages/stillborns/dead calves/attack animals (such as ourselves) in captivity, that I felt this was really needed.

Ok you cocky little brat, I don’t have the energy or time to begin to touch the surface of this post. But I know people who do. Take it from here yoursuchatwat themidnightclub bethevoiceseathechange

Have fun getting learned.

*crack knuckles* I’ll be on the computer in a few minutes..

Also
coffeeandkudzu
do you want to take a crack at this one?

Re: collapsed fins — collapsed fins do occur in the wild as a result of trauma and disease. Stranded orcas’ dorsals tend to begin to collapse while the rescue team waits for the tides to come in. The pod of Resident Killer Whales that unfortunately and fatefully swam through the Exxon Valdez oil spill experienced dorsal collapse and a large number of their pod has subsequently died (cntrl+f “dorsal”). Reproduction within that pod has ceased or is practically non-existent and it’s probably not going to make it past another generation. The surviving sons of deceased killer whale mothers dorsals tend to collapse, clearly from psychological trauma. (I saw a photo recently on tumblr maybe?? If I can get tag numbers for some of these wild whales, that would be great. cute-whales is right, we really do need a central database of articles.)

[ETA: oops, I’ve been corrected — it was actually youresuchatwat who wanted to make a database and I’m TOTES DOWN TO DO WHAT I CAN but I do have other stuff that has to come first like work + my writing DRAFTOCALYPSE this summer. Anyway — sorry for the mis-tag!]

Flukes curling under is natural in male whales and occurs as they mature. Orca flukes contain no bones, unlike pectoral fins, and it’s simply the weight of the flesh (obvi — more in males) + the water pressure from forward propulsion that causes the curling. Those last two pictures are irrelevant.

Re: rakes and scars — no anticap worth their salt states that rakes do not occur in the wild. Orca scientists have even noted that rakes occur in the wild. What we argue is that orcas in the wild have A WHOLE OCEAN in which they can dart and evade contact with orcas with whom they have rocky relationships.

Re: no animals dying in the wild — UHM WHAT #NO. Transient orcas are meat eaters. They eat penguins, seals, sea lions, even other dolphins. Meanwhile, SeaWorld (or whatever unpaid intern they let man the message boards) doesn’t even seem to know the difference between Transient and Resident orcas.

Infant orcas have a 50% mortality rate in the wild. Tbh, that’s on par with most wild animals generally. Mother killer whales grieve for their lost children and will push the carcass on their rostrum until they have come to terms with their loss, finally letting the carcass drop. Dolphins do the same thing.

Re: the last two photographs in this set — The first is clearly an injury. (Is that one of the Stumpys?). Ben (New Zealand) was run over by a boat prop and the larger piece has flopped over. See above — trauma can cause collapse.

Re: ground-down teeth — some whales, particularly in the Pacific Community, hunt sharks. Sharks have rough skin. It’s now believed that these worn down teeth are a direct result of hunting sharks. NOT FROM CHEWING ON CONCRETE OR JAW POPPING ON METAL GATES FROM FRUSTRATION. Luckily, even where mature orcas are no longer able to tear at the carcass, they are social animals and are known to divide and share their kills. (Plus, the way an orca kills a shark is actually strangely bloodless. They flip it over to induce tonic immobility, and then hold it still until it drowns. Donezo.)

Thursday May 15 @ 01:28am
Oh, for the years I have not lived, but only dreamed of living. Nathaniel Hawthorne (via observando) Thursday May 8 @ 07:53pm

ariaste:

fanoftheworldofthemouse:

charamath:

It took me forever and a half, but I’ve finally gotten prints of all 12 of the current ‘Yzma is Best Princess’ series up in my etsy store.  Along with the original paintings, for the hard-core collectors out there :)

Please check them out or maybe even help spread the word.  Thank you!

https://www.etsy.com/shop/charamath

*please do not remove the text/source from my posts.  Thank you very much for respecting my work!

This is the best!

My favorite is the Esmerelda one where her boobs are flapping in the wind.

Thursday May 8 @ 07:48pm
next


powered by tumblr | themed by fusels